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Granary Sourdough (airing cupboard fermentation)

My first attempt at this recipe used just Light Malthouse flour, which made delicious bread, but with such a strong flavour that it overpowered everything it accompanied. I've added in wholemeal flour to make it a bit mellower and a little rice flour to help give a drier crumb. If you don't have rice flour, just use wholemeal flour instead. I've been making this for a few weeks now and this is my current favourite: a soft, open crumb and a big flavour, but not overpowering. It works well either toasted with jam or for savoury sandwiches. The airing cupboard gives the doughs a narrow temperature range, draught free: I prefer this to the kitchen worktop.

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Granary Sourdough
Batch: two loaves, 1800g

Basic Dough Ingredients
SM Organic Light Malthouse Flour           674g
SM Stoneground Wholemeal Flour (HB)  265g
SM Organic Brown Rice Flour                  49g
Water                                                    760g
Leaven                                                  155g
Salt                                                       20g

Leaven Ingredients
SM Stoneground Wholemeal Flour (HB)   62g
Water                                                     62g
Starter                                                   31g

Important Note
Weigh out the water and the wholemeal flour for the basic dough, we will take what's required for the leaven from this.

Here's my log of the bake...

Day 1
0715—prepared the leaven, this time using 100% wholemeal flour. Refreshed the starter. Left the starter on the worktop and the leaven in the airing cupboard.
1335—autolyse the flours and water, placed in the airing cupboard.
1350—spread over the leaven, mixed thoroughly and placed in the airing cupboard.
1420—sprinkled over the salt and mixed thoroughly, returned to airing cupboard.
1440—stretch and fold for around 2 minutes, returned to airing cupboard.
1500—stretch and fold, returned to airing cupboard.
1515—stretch and fold, returned to airing cupboard.
1530—dough temperature 25.4oC, windowpane test nearly there. Stretch and fold, returned to airing cupboard.
1600—windowpane passes. Stretch and fold and return to airing cupboard for remainder of bulk fermentation. Boiler now on so dough will get warmer.
1730— dough temperature 27.0oC and it looks ready. Ending bulk fermentation.
1750—shaped (very badly!) and placed in baskets dusted with brown rice flour.
1810—placed in the fridge for overnight proofing.

Day 2
0745—turned on the fan oven to its highest setting and placed tin lids in
0755—took the loaves out of the fridge. There's still some evidence of the awful hash I'd made of shaping. Dusted the bottoms with brown rice flour and turned out onto trays. Dusted off the excess flour and then lighted sifted over more brown rice flour, scored down the middle.
0800—one at a time, I removed a tin lid from the oven, placed it over the loaf and then slid it in the oven.
0830—removed the lids, swapped the loaves top to bottom and front to back.
0845—rotated tins front to back.
0900—placed on cooling rack.

Here's the result of the bake (problems during shaping not evident!) -

Added by: fourjays


Tags: Bread Malt Sourdough

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