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An easy everyday sourdough loaf for your bread machine

A deliciously simple and quick loaf from your bread machine using sourdough starter: great when you haven't got time or patience to work out a loaf with your hands. A recipe inspired by the Eastern European style of sourdough bread. Ideally made with Shipton Mill Light Rye flour. Tested and tried on Panasonic breadmaker (SP - ZB2502) but should work well on any other quality bread maker.

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Ingredients

250g Shipton Mill Light Rye Flour

150g Shipton Mill Untreated White Bread No 4 Flour (or can be another good quality strong white from Shipton Mill)

180g Sourdough Starter - medium thickness (c 70% hydrated)

15g Extra Virgin Olive Oil (or another good quality oil such as cold pressed rapeseed oil)

3/4 - 1 Teaspoon Salt (according to taste)

10g - Active dried yest (alternatively organic fresh yeast activated) I primarily use dried yest to 'help' sourdough rising. Please note that this recipe is for my bog-standard every day easy loaf when I haven't got time to put more effort to make the process more artisan.

260ml water (room temperature)

Optional ingredients:

Please note that seeds can be added according to your own taste and preferences. However, do not overdo these as the bread will not rise enough.

* Caraway seeds - a couple of teaspoons

or

* Linseeds - a handful

Method

1. Place all ingredients in the baking bowl of the breadmaker. I follow the below order which has proved to work well.

* Sourdough starter

* Flour

* Olive Oil

* Salt

* Seeds (if used)

* Water

* Yeast (put in the special yeast dispenser of your bread maker if it has one; this will make better results, otherwise place with other ingredients)

2. Insert baking basket in the body of bread machine. Close the lid. If the machine has a yeast dispenser now put yeast there (as per description above).

3. Select a relevant program for a Rye Loaf. In my machine it is programme 07 (Rye) and the process takes 3.30 hrs. Alternatively you could use a programme for speciality bread (4.30 hrs) or even the one for the standard white loaf (my machine is 4 hours for that one).

4. Once the process is complete in the machine, take the loaf out immediately and place on a ribbed baking tray or in a basket to rest and cool down.

5. Enjoy your loaf and share generously

Notes:

1. Ensure you do not pour salt straight into your sourdough starter and yeast as it will stop them working effectively.

2. Sourdough starter works best if freshly activated (bubbling) but it has worked for me when it was calmer.

3. This recipe can be used with a delayed programme in the bread maker. However, results may vary dependent on strength of the yeast and starter.

4. You can use the proportions of 300g of light rye, 100g of white flour and starter subject to taste and preferences.

Your feedback is welcome!

 

Added by: Wojciech Kaczanowski


Tags: Bread Rye Sourdough

Add comment
A good formula for bread maker sourdough

I don't use a bread maker myself but my friend has one and between us we worked out a fool proof formula for a sourdough. You might like to try it. Here it is... The flour within the starter should be 30% (in bakers percentages) of the flour and done on the French Bread cycle. For example: Bread Flour 500g, Water 240g (final hydration being 60%), Salt 11-12g, Starter 300g @ 100% hydration (150g flour + 150g water which makes the flour within the starter 30% of the 500g flour). You'll need to prepare your 300g starter in the breadpan the night before. So before bed mix 60g of starter + 120g water + 120g bread flour (1:2:2 build for example but build however you wish as long as you end up with 300g starter that is mature and bubbly before carrying making the dough). Mix by hand but include the paddle. The next day do as follows... Add the 240g water to the starter and mix thoroughly to disperse. In a bowl mix the 500g flour and salt. Now sprinkle the flour over the starter. Choose the French Bread cycle.

A BakEr 09 April 2016

Reply
A good formula for bread maker sourdough

I don't use a bread maker myself but my friend has one and between us we worked out a foolproof formula for a sourdough. You might like to try it. Here it is... The flour within the starter should be 30% (in bakers percentages) of the flour and done on the French Bread cycle. For example: Bread Flour 500g Water 240g (final hydration being 60%) Salt 11-12g Starter 300g @ 100% hydration (150g flour + 150g water which makes the flour within the starter 30% of the 500g flour) You'll need to prepare your 300g starter in the breadpan the night before. So before bed mix 60g of starter + 120g water + 120g bread flour (1:2:2 build for example but build however you wish as long as you end up with 300g starter that is mature and bubbly before carrying making the dough). Mix by hand but include the paddle. The next day do as follows... Add the 240g water to the starter and mix thoroughly to disperse. In a bowl mix the 500g flour and salt. Now sprinkle the flour over the starter. Choose the French Bread cycle.

A BakEr 09 April 2016

Reply
RE: A good formula for bread maker sourdough

Hiya The recipe sounds good. It is not that indifferent to mine, I just tend to use spelt or rye flours combined with white bread flour to give it a better lift. I usually prepare my starter a day before but never thought about letting it rise in the bread pan. Will give it a go and comment further. Happy baking.

Wojciech Kaczanowski 15 April 2016


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