We use cookies to give you the best possible experience on our website. Carry on browsing if you’re happy with this, or see our Cookie Policy for more information.

Country blend rye sourdough

A delicious rye-infused sourdough made with 50% pre-ferment over 24hrs.

Like this? Share it with your friends.


Report abuse

Ingredients

Pre-ferment:

500g Shipton Mill untreated organic white flour
400g water
50g starter

Final dough:

950g Pre-ferment

300g Shipton Mill Canadian strong white flour
200g Shipton Mill dark rye flour
380g water
300g starter (SM untreated organic white flour & SM dark rye flour)
21g salt

Method

Based on a schedule that works around life (and kids!) where most of the stages are carried out in the morning and evening.

Day 1: Evening. Mix ingredients for levain. Leave for 8-12hrs at room temp. Autolyse flour and water for final dough over night in large mixing bowl. Feed starter for use next morning.

Day 2: Morning. Add ingredients for final dough to large mixing bowl - water & flour, levain and starter. Mix by hand folding over repeadedly, adding salt at end. Stretch and fold 3-4 times every 30 mins or so. Allow about 2.5-3hrs for bulk fermentation. Divide and shape. Place loafs in baskets, bag up and leave in fridge.

Day 2: Evening. Place loafs on baking steel and/or dutch oven and add to pre-heated oven. Slash tops and cook for about 40 mins until crust is dark brown and caramelised. Leave to cool.

Added by: Tom Britton


Tags: Bread Rye Sourdough

Add comment
Day 2

I’m trying this recipe for the first time and have just mixed all the ingredients at the start of Day 2. What I have is a bowl of a very sticky gloopy mixture, not at all like the workable dough I was expecting, as per my normal wheat flour sourdough bake. It this normal or have I done something wrong?

Ru Carslake 15 October 2017

Reply
RE: Day 2

I get that sometimes. Usually because the levain is too ripe and it breaks down the gluten in the flour. The rye really gets it going too when you mix on day 2. Try less time, keep it cooler overnight or use less of it in final dough.

Mr Tom Britton 16 October 2017

RE: Day 2

Thanks Tom, that makes sense as we live in the tropics. I'll adjust times next time. Actually the end result was surprisingly good. Shaping was more a matter of gently placing the sticky blob in baskets and tins (I tried both) and at bake time I had all but given up on it. The oven bounce however was very impressive, crust was excellent and it it tasted great. Can't wait to try it again.

Ru Carslake 17 October 2017

Country blend rye sourdough

Thoroughly confused. I understand making pre-ferment, and leaving out for 12 hours. It's the next part that is driving me crazy, perhaps Yank English is colliding with yours. I then understand you to say autolyze strong white, rye and water. At the same time.You then say...............and I am going bonkers. This is very confusing. What flours and what water at what time...................... I have been baking sourdough wheat and rye breads for years, but am totally mystified as to what I am seeing. PLEASE TRANSLATE.

Alan 29 September 2017

Reply
RE: Country blend rye sourdough

I'm with you Allan, I can't make head or tail of it with the description and method as given.

Mr Keith Pitts 30 September 2017

RE: Country blend rye sourdough

I'm not sure I understand what you don't understand. So basically the pre-ferment and the autolyse of remaining flour and water happen at the same time. It's all then mixed together in the morning with the starter and salt.

Mr Tom Britton 04 October 2017


Add a recipe & get 15% off

If you add a recipe with a photo to the Shipton Mill website, we will send you a voucher for 15% off your next order from the Flour Direct shop.

15% off Flour Direct

It's very easy, just click here to visit your "My Shipton Mill" page to get started.

Shipton Mill Cookbook – A Handful of Flour

We are beyond excited to announce the launch our first cookbook with Headline Publishing.

A Handful of Flour

“A Handful Of Flour” explores a myriad of flours and their different flavours, in a selection of well-worked classic recipes with a fresh and contemporary twist.

More than just a baking book, this is a book to introduce you to cooking with flour in general, from popular and classic varieties to ancient grains and gluten free flours.

More ...