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Clive's white spelt bread

Sponge and dough with a slow fermentation for a better spelt loaf

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first stage set down
%
White Spelt            100
salt                           2
yeast                        1
water                       55
finished dough temp 21oc
Develop to a full dough
stand in bulk for 12 hours then place into the fridge running at pluss 5oc or there abouts for 24 hours
main dough
White Spelt             100
salt                            2
yeast                         1
malt extract                0.5
water                        60
sponge (above)          50
Finished dough temp 25oc
Place all the ingredients into the mixer with exception to the sponge and develop until just starting to become clear then add the sponge and continue to develop until silky
Place into your proving box covered to avoid skinning and stand at an ambient temperature for one hour
tip out the dough onto your work surface dusted lightly with flour press out the dough slightly and then fold the dough into three by gently stretching it from the bottom to the middle and then from the top to the middle ,place back into the covered box
stand in bulk for a further 30 mins
take out of the box and scale off into you required weights hand up,put to one side covered for 20mins to recover then proceed to mould into your final shape
Final proof will only be about 30 mins depending on you ambient temperature but the product prefers to be slightly under proved and will perform better if taken earlier rather than later
For the wholemeal ,if you are selling it as 100% spelt and not as 100% wholemeal spelt I would use the white sponge above and add it at only 25% of the main dough and follow the above recipe for the final dough but rember to add 8% more water to the final dough stage and 0.5% more yeast

I find that a slow fermentation is the key to a good spelt bread.

First stage - Sponge

%

White Spelt            100

salt                           2

yeast                        1

water                       55

Finished dough temp 21oc

Develop to a full dough.

Stand in bulk for 12 hours then place into the fridge running at plus 5oc or there abouts for 24 hours.

Main dough

%

White Spelt             100

salt                            2

yeast                         1

malt extract                0.5

water                        60

sponge (above)          50

Finished dough temp 25oc

Place all the ingredients into the mixer with exception to the sponge and develop until just starting to become clear, then add the sponge and continue to develop until silky.

Place into your proving box, covered to avoid skinning and stand at an ambient temperature for one hour.

Tip out the dough onto your work surface dusted lightly with flour. Press out the dough slightly and then fold the dough into three by gently stretching it from the bottom to the middle and then from the top to the middle, place back into the covered box. Stand in bulk for a further 30 mins.

Take out of the box and scale off into you required weights. Hand up, put to one side covered for 20mins to recover then proceed to mould into your final shape.

Final proof will only be about 30 mins depending on you ambient temperature, but the product prefers to be slightly under proved and will perform better if taken earlier rather than later.

 

 

Added by: webmaster

Add comment
Sadly you won't get many peoplel trying such an incomplete recipe - where are the precise quantities of flour/yeast? Needs to be more detailed. New bread bakers need very detailed information as I found from running bread baking courses.

Anna Evans - anna@realcakes.co.uk 29 March 2010

Reply
RE:
Having just been on one of Clive's wonderful courses, the quantities are all in the recipe. The percentages show the proportions of ingredients to each other. 100% flour can be translated as 100g, 500g or 1000g depending on the amount of bread needed. It may seem a different way of thinking about measuring, but it is about the all important ratio of ingredients to each other and how they interact. Most books written by bakers will give similar information.

Anne Finlay-Baird - Annefb 18 November 2010

RE:
We have a paradox here. It seems odd that you are "running bread baking courses" and yet you don't understand baker's percentages? Should you not attend a course or two yourself?

Anthony Wetherall - Wheatoholic 17 February 2012

RE:
Hurray, Bakers Percentages - life is so much easier when you do not have to get out pen, paper & calculator & waste time recalculating the amounts of ingredients needed. I will use this recipe for my Lammas loaf. •_•

- Ladybreadmaker 06 July 2012


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